Detailed 1981 Soviet military plan/map showing the Canberra City Centre, the Parliamentary Triangle and surrounding area

Detailed 1981 Soviet military plan/map showing the Canberra City Centre, the Parliamentary Triangle and surrounding area

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‘There is an article on this plan in the latest issue of The Globe - journal of the Australian and New Zealand Map Society Inc. (ANZMapS) ; including translations of the text at the bottom of the maps. This journal is available in public libraries’–AJgloe

A 1963 prediction of Africa at the beginning of the 21st century

A 1963 prediction of Africa at the beginning of the 21st century

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‘They were right about the Portuguese fighting like hell to keep their colonies at least … Yeah they kept them until the early 70s, a time when pretty much all former colonial nations had given independence or abandoned their colonies

It’s even funnier when you think about that as early as 1914 there was an agreement between Britain and Germany to split Mozambique between the two Nation’s colonies, which was then obviously interrupted by another minor historical event, you probably don’t know about it’

1881 language [Gaelic] map of the British Isles

1881 language [Gaelic] map of the British Isles

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How about today? How’re the celtic languages doing? How effective are the efforts to revive them? …. Welsh is doing well, it’s taught in most [if not all] Welsh schools aswell as some English schools. If you go to Northern Wales you hear spoken Welsh pretty commonly and all Welsh roadsigns are Bilingual by law.

Manx is also having a successful revival, with widespread education and recognition. Despite the Isle of Man’s relatively small size there are Manx radio stations and a school which teaches mostly in Manx. Considering the language was nearly dead 50 years ago this is brilliant to see.

Cornish is less successful, it is taught in clubs and societies but all Government funding has been dropped for it. There are a few hundred fluent speakers but it’s very rare to hear spoken in public. Cornish is the only living Celtic language still spoken in Mainland England, and has been after Cumbric died in the 13th century.

Scottish Gaelic (not to be confused with Scots) is also on the up, it is taught in a lot of Scottish schools and spoken natively in the Western Isles. Recently it has gained a lot of recognition and popularity.

Overall its very heartwarming to see such successful revival efforts. Cornish is the only one at risk of being lost, which is a great shame since Cornish is one of only 3 Brithonic languages still alive (The others being Welsh and Breton), Brithonic languages were the Original languages spoken in Great Britain before the Germanic conquests. The other Celtic languages spoken in Great Britain (Manx and Scots Gaelic) are Gaelic, and originated in Ireland’